I had the oddest experiences with AT&T today. I phoned them to adjust our iPhone plan (1500 text messages is way over our need). At the end of my conversation with a customer service rep, I was asked how I would rate my satisfaction with the phone call. This wasn’t an automated survey; I was to verbally tell the person I had been talking to my rating. The service went well and I was happy to give a good rating, but was doubtful I would feel comfortable rating someone poorly over the phone.

It doesn’t appear AT&T is interested in the poor ratings anyhow. Coincidentally, I phoned the same division at AT&T earlier today. I had such a difficult time making changes with them that I decided to wait to make plan changes until later, when I could call back and try to get a new representative. During this unpleasant call, I was not asked to rate our conversation.

If AT&T is interested in hearing about positive customer experiences only, they miss out on tremendous opportunities to improve! In our own project end survey, we’ve learned a great deal from clients who have answered the questions How did you like working with Needmore Designs? How could we improve? For example, while we are usually applauded for our quick communication, we’ve had a couple clients mention that they would have liked to talk more to us over the phone (or in person) rather than via email, etc. We took this to heart and began to keep our phones handy for more frequent chats throughout projects. Without this valuable information, we would be much less likely to find out what more we can do right.